miroque

Aug 23

Jan 25

[video]

(Source: telegin)

Dec 04

(Source: z-kitsch)

mineralia:

Opal
by The Mineral Kingdom

mineralia:

Opal

by The Mineral Kingdom

(Source: pytrichor, via mineralia)

biocanvas:

Protoplasts from Nicotiana benthamiana, a type of tobacco, with chloroplasts stained in red.
By Heiti Paves, Centre of Excellence ENVIRON.

biocanvas:

Protoplasts from Nicotiana benthamiana, a type of tobacco, with chloroplasts stained in red.

By Heiti Paves, Centre of Excellence ENVIRON.

biocanvas:

A mammalian heart at 10-times magnification.
Image by Hillary Guzik, Rochester Institute of Technology
THIS WEEK’S QUESTION!
Every Sunday, a question will be asked about one of the images from the past week. Be the first to answer correctly, and your blog will be promoted on Monday’s image post and Biocanvas’s main site!

Due to their rapid rate of cell division, cancerous tumors require vast amounts of oxygen and nutrients in order to grow. To facilitate this need, tumors release factors that encourage the growth of new blood vessels in a process known as angiogenesis. Recently, the first anti-angiogenic drug, Avastin, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for cancer.
What is Avastin and how does it specifically work to prevent angiogenesis?
Answer: Avastin, also known as bevacizumab, is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognizes and binds to VEGF-A, a growth factor for angiogenesis. The antibody’s binding prevents VEGF-A from interacting with its receptor, inhibiting the signaling pathway that triggers new blood vessel growth.

biocanvas:

A mammalian heart at 10-times magnification.

Image by Hillary Guzik, Rochester Institute of Technology

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION!

Every Sunday, a question will be asked about one of the images from the past week. Be the first to answer correctly, and your blog will be promoted on Monday’s image post and Biocanvas’s main site!

Due to their rapid rate of cell division, cancerous tumors require vast amounts of oxygen and nutrients in order to grow. To facilitate this need, tumors release factors that encourage the growth of new blood vessels in a process known as angiogenesis. Recently, the first anti-angiogenic drug, Avastin, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for cancer.

What is Avastin and how does it specifically work to prevent angiogenesis?

Answer: Avastin, also known as bevacizumab, is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognizes and binds to VEGF-A, a growth factor for angiogenesis. The antibody’s binding prevents VEGF-A from interacting with its receptor, inhibiting the signaling pathway that triggers new blood vessel growth.

(via mineralia)

notoriousmlv:

 (by phreakocious)

notoriousmlv:

 (by phreakocious)

(via mineralia)